Global Health News and Events

World Population Day: Why seven billion matters U.N. Officials Highlight Concern About Humanitarian Situation In East Africa

"U.N. officials sounded the alarm Tuesday about a deepening crisis in East Africa, saying they are struggling to cope with the number of people on the move in the region because of the severe drought and continued fighting in Somalia," the Associated Press reports. "World Food Program Executive Director Josette Sheeran said the drought has left millions hungry, farmers at risk of losing their livelihoods and the lives of hundreds of thousands of children at risk," the AP writes (7/12)

Second-Hand Smoke Still a Major Killer

This year, tobacco use will kill nearly six million people. Of that number, 600,000 will die because of exposure to second- hand tobacco smoke. If current trends continue, the annual death toll could rise to eight million by 2030, according to a new report by the World Health Organization (WHO), with more than 80 percent of the deaths occurring in low- and middle-income countries "We have the means to prevent this needless tragedy. Political will is the key," Timothy O'Leary, WHO communications officer, told IPS.

National HIV Prevention Conference

Date: August 14-17, 2011
Location: Atlanta, GA

MUSC College of Nursing dean launches mental health curriculum in Africa

Gail W. Stuart, PhD, RN, FAAN, dean of the Medical University of South Carolina College of Nursing, returned from Africa where she developed and launched a mental health curriculum for health care officials in Monrovia, Liberia. Stuart was recently tapped by the Carter Center to lead a mental health workshop that will aid in the efforts to develop a mental health component of training for mid-level providers for Liberia’s Ministry of Health and Social Welfare.

Ghana Project - A Better Future

A small creek is the only source of water. Huts of grass, mud and concrete are constructed haphazardly wherever a place allows. There’s no architecture here, no plumbing, no indoor bathrooms. Every day is about survival.

But on a day in January, the villagers of Okurase, Ghana, West Africa, are celebrating. Eighteen villagers have completed a six-month brick-making training class and are graduating. As part of the ceremony, they show everyone how they make bricks.

Ghana Project - A Better Future

A small creek is the only source of water. Huts of grass, mud and concrete are constructed haphazardly wherever a place allows. There’s no architecture here, no plumbing, no indoor bathrooms. Every day is about survival.

But on a day in January, the villagers of Okurase, Ghana, West Africa, are celebrating. Eighteen villagers have completed a six-month brick-making training class and are graduating. As part of the ceremony, they show everyone how they make bricks.

Bricks of Promise

It wasn't just a brick. It was a literal and figurative building block — a brick that promised sustainability, friendship and a better future for a small village in Ghana. It's a piece of building material that has unified people on both sides of an ocean, a brick that portends commerce, culture, health and home. A brick that heralds vocation, growth and change to a village named Okurase. But the first brick Moore held was the remnant of disappointment.

Bricks of Promise

It wasn't just a brick. It was a literal and figurative building block — a brick that promised sustainability, friendship and a better future for a small village in Ghana. It's a piece of building material that has unified people on both sides of an ocean, a brick that portends commerce, culture, health and home. A brick that heralds vocation, growth and change to a village named Okurase. But the first brick Moore held was the remnant of disappointment.

Full circle: Sweetgrass basket idea leads to African neck brace

Pages